Category: j.s. bach

A daily dose of Bach 

A daily dose of Bach 

Partita No. 5 in G major, BWV 829 – 3. Corrente 

Trevor Pinnock, harpsichord

polyphonyrocks: A daily dose of Bach  BWV 489 …

polyphonyrocks:

A daily dose of Bach 

BWV 489 – Nicht so traurig, nicht so sehr 

Sibylla Rubens, soprano
James Taylor, tenor

polyphonyrocks: A daily dose of Bach  Concerto…

polyphonyrocks:

A daily dose of Bach 

Concerto for Two Violins in D minor, BWV 1043 – 1. Vivace

Itzhak Perlman & Pinchas Zukerman with the English Chamber Orchestra under Daniel Barenboim

A daily dose of Bach Sonata for Violin & H…

A daily dose of Bach 

Sonata for Violin & Harpsichord in E minor, BWV 1023 –

1. Preludio 

Penelope Spencer, violin
David Roblou, harpsichord

A daily dose of Bach 

A daily dose of Bach 

Chorale: BWV 421 – Er kann und will dich lassen nicht  

Rundfunkchor Berlin – Robin Gritton

A daily dose of Bach 

A daily dose of Bach 

Keyboard Concerto in D Minor, BWV 1052 – 3. Allegro  

Polina Osetinskaya, piano
The Mariinsky String Orchestra | Anton Gakkel

This Sunday’s Bach Cantata – 16th Sunday…

This Sunday’s Bach Cantata – 16th Sunday after Trinity 

BWV 95 – Christus, der ist mein Leben – 1. Chorus and Recitative 

Collegium Vocale Gent, under the direction of Philippe Herreweghe  

 Christ is my life,
 death is my reward;
 to which I abandon myself,
 I joyfully depart from here.
With joy,
indeed with heart-felt delight
I wish to depart from here.
Even if today it came: you must!
Yet I am willing and ready
to place my poor body, my exhausted limbs,
the garment of mortality
again in the earth
and in its bosom.
My funeral song is already completed;
ah, that I might sing it today!
 With peace and joy I depart
 in God’s will,
 My heart and mind are comforted,
 calm, and quiet.
 As God had promised me:
 death has become my sleep.

A daily dose of Bach 

A daily dose of Bach 

Fughetta super “Gelobet seist du, Jesu Christ”, BWV 696   

Ton Koopman, organ  

mikrokosmos: Bach – Sonata in C Major, BWV 966…

mikrokosmos:

BachSonata in C Major, BWV 966

Of the few keyboard sonatas Bach wrote, this one is the most “luminous” to me. That is, it feels so bright and almost divine. Maybe that’s too sappy, I don’t know. But the opening chord is a basic C major triad but dispersed to give a very open and wide colorful sound. We slowly rise, simple counterpoint carries us forward in fragments of the original idea, three voices singing together in waves. The allemande takes us into a moderately flowing string of notes, a lot of emphasis on harmony in thirds. The adagio thins the texture out more, opening with a monophonic passage, before including a reaction from the left hand. This introduction is cut by an allegro section that makes the character more sunny. This acts as a transition into the fugue on a long subject that moves up and down [again] like a wave. The fugue carries us through this burst of energy and light until winding down to a glorious coda. The most interesting part of this sonata is that it isn’t original music by Bach. It seems to be a transcription of some kind after a partita by Johann Adam Reincken, a German/Dutch composer who was considered one of the most important German baroque composers before Bach and had strongly influenced J.S. Unfortunately we do not have much of his music, and so I cannot find the original work that inspired this sonata, but it is a good thing Bach saved this angelic work that otherwise would have been lost to time.

Movements:

1. Prelude

2. Allemande

3. Adagio

4. Fugue

Sviatoslav Richter, piano

A daily dose of Bach 

A daily dose of Bach 

Partita No. 5 in G major, BWV 829 – 2. Allemande 

Trevor Pinnock, harpsichord